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Myrtles Plantation

Myrtles Plantation is a historic home and former antebellum plantation in St. Francisville, Louisiana. It was built in 1796 by General David Bradford. The plantation is on a hill and built in the Creole cottage-style that characterized many of the state’s plantation houses in the 19th century. The house has twenty-two rooms spread over two […]

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Hotel Monte Vista

The Hotel Monte Vista is a famous and historic hotel in Flagstaff, Arizona. Built in 1927, it remains the centerpiece of the historic downtown district. The hotel contains 73 rooms on three floors, and dozens of celebrities have spent a night or two in its suites: everyone from John Wayne and Humphrey Bogard to Anthony […]

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The Iroquois Theater/Death Alley

  The Iroquois Theater was located at 24 West Randolph Street, a central location in the already-bustling city. The theater had a capacity of 1,602 with three separate audience levels–the main floor had 700 seats, the second level has more than 400 seats, and the third level had around 500. Though the multi-tiered theater drew […]

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The Stanley Hotel

The Stanley Hotel is, perhaps, the most recognized hotel in the United States. The 142-room Colonial Revival building is located in Estes Park, Colorado–around five miles from the entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park. Built by Freelan Oscar Stanley (of Stanley Steamer fame) in 1909, the hotel originally catered to the American upper class; the […]

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Fort Mifflin

Commissioned in 1771, Fort Mifflin is one of America’s last remaining relics of the Revolutionary War. Also known as Mud Island Fort, it is located on Mud Island on the Delaware River just south of Philadelphia. In 1777, the British Army stormed and captured the fort as part of their conquest of Philadelphia. Fort Mifflin […]

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The Untold Story of Milleridge

The Milleridge Inn, Cottage, and Shops are a treasured piece of Long Island history. A sought-after destination for wedding receptions, romantic weekends, and historical tours, the building broke ground in 1672. However, with every piece of history, there are accompanying “untold stories”—those which relay uneasy feelings, glimpsed figures, and moving objects. New England and the […]

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Introducing Thousand Ridge Haunts!

We’re biased, but the history of America’s Northeast is beautiful, intriguing, and littered with these untold stories—some of them mysterious, others downright haunting. Thousand Ridge Haunts is dedicated to telling these “untold stories” about America’s hidden, historical and/or haunted sites.    

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